Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Juicer Math.

A scrim set has a single, two doubles, a half single and a half double in it.* The Gaffer says to put in another single into the tweenie that you're standing next too. The problem is that it's already got a double and a single in it, leaving you without anymore singles in the scrim bag for that light. The Gaffer also tells you to pull out a single from the redhead when you're done with the tweenie. But the redhead doesn't have any singles in it. Just the two doubles.

What do you do?

(Bonus question: What do you have when you've got two doubles and a single in a light?
Answer: The wrong light.)


*Previously.

6 comments :

Niall said...

Tweenie: Pull the single drop the second double. Quad over all

Red head: Pull a double drop the single. Triple over all.

I love math. This was nice, keeps the brain sharp.

Bonus: The wrong Fucking Light or a film school special.

A.J. said...

Niall - Yup! You got it!

Bonus: Another acceptable answer (albeit a more boring one) is "a full house". But I gotta admit that "film school special" is a new one to me and I kinda like it!

Michael Taylor said...

On a feature down in North Carolina twenty-odd years ago, I started doing the scrim/net/window-screen math for a 12 K beaming into a bedroom window for the scene we were shooting. By the time those 12,000 watts of light fought their way through all that metal, glass, and cloth, I figured there were about 200 watts falling on that bed.

Thus did a 12 K become an inky...

Niall said...

Michael- Those moments hurt because the 12k is somewhere perilous that took you an hour to run cable and distro, lug the light out there, land it, aim it, and tweek.

When for the price of an inkie and piece of paper on the barn doors you'd get the same damn look.

As a friend and co-worker says. Movies are stupid.

srisang said...

I enjoyed reading your blog ~ thanks for posting such useful content.

Juicers

A.J. said...

srisang - Mmm... Juice! :)

Thanks for stopping by!

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